About your Search

20131029
20131029
STATION
CNNW 3
COM 3
CSPAN2 2
KCSM (PBS) 2
CNBC 1
CSPAN 1
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
. at this point nato is just one big ass pile. but the merkel jerks out there keep saying but remember what obama said in his 2008 berlin speech. >> true partnership and true progress requires constant work and sustained sacrifice. they require allies who willi will listen to each other, learn from each other and most of all trust. >> listen, learn, trust. two out of three isn't bad. >> nsa spying scandal just won't go away. now congress is preparing to step in with landmark legislation that could drastically change what the agency does and how they do it. how to scare pirates on the open seas? by blasting britney spears. world series didn't end with a ridiculous play but one team is one play away from a title. this is way too early. good morning everybody, brian shactman. nfl game in st. louis last night as well.
east and europe. turkey's economic ties with china are becoming stronger. but, as a nato member and a key ally of the united states, it's important for turkey to strike a strategic balance in east asia. that means japan will remain an important partner. nhk world, tokyo. >>> a japanese research team says most of the radioactive cesium that fell on the forest floor after the accident at the fukushima plant is still in the same place. researchers from the japan atomic energy agency installed monitoring equipment in woods near fukushima prefecture in may 2011. that was two months after the accident. they hope to learn how cesium moves from fallen leaves to soil. the results show that rain washed it off leaves six months after the accident. the researchers say that as the leaves decomposed, the cesium moved into the soil. after two years of research, they say that only about 0.1% to 0.2% has reached a depth of 10 centimeters. >> translator: the results suggest that the cesium has not penetrated deep into the ground. i think the findings will be useful to decontaminate affected areas
muchacho tiene ngre de vencedor? [sríe]>es un luchador nato. >>con entrenamiento y disciplina e muchacho va a llar y lejos. y por eso no hay que preocuparse, porque de eso me encargo yo personaen >>¡ah! [♪] [voz baja] >>¡bÁrbara! [♪] ♪ [ locutor ] usd ha llegado a la edad en que darse por venci no es a opción. ♪ esta es la edad da saber cómo salir adelante. asíue...¿por qué dejar que la disfunción eréil se interponga? hale cu médico sobre viagra. mliones de hombres ya lo han hecho. pregúntele a su médico si su corazón es suficientemente saludable para ten relaciones sexuales. no tome viagra si toma nitratos para el dolor en el pecho, yaue puede causa una caída go en la presión arterial. los efectos secundarios incluyen dolor de caba, rubor facial, lestar estomacal y sión anormal. ra evitar lesiones a largo plazo, procure atención médica de inmediato por una erección que dure más de cuatro horas. deje de tomar viagra y llame a smédico en seguida si sufre una rápida disminución o pérdida de la vista oe la audición. esta es la edad de actuar. viagra. hable con
the allies are just screwing around on everybody else. at this point nato is just one big ass pile. but the merkel jerks out there keep saying but remember what obama said in his 2008 berlin speech. >> true partnership and true progress requires constant work and sustained sacrifice. they require
the allies are screwing around on everybody else. at this point, nato is just one big ass-pile. (laughter) but the merkel jerks out there keep saying ooh, but remember what obama said in his 2008 berlin speech? >> true partnership and true progress requires constant work and sustained sacrifice. they require allies who will listen to each other, learn from each other, and, most of all, trust each other. (cheers and applause). >> stephen: listen, learn, trust. you know, two out of three ain't bad. (laughter) i just hope the europeans can find in the their hearts to trust us again so they'll start talking about things on the phone that are worth listening to. here to tell me if they ever will is pulitzer prize winning national security correspondent for the "new york times" mark mazzetti. mark, thanks so much for being here. (cheers and applause) good to see you. okay, you are the author of "the c.i.a. secret army and war at the ends of the earth called the way of the knife." so let's talk about this. are we doing this? >> yeah, it seems that certainly the u.s. is doing pretty much most of
, but collected from a number of sources by the u.s. and nato allies in support of military operations abroad. here's how they made that case at the hearings today. >> the assertions by spain, italy, that nsa collected ten of million of phone call are completely false. to be perfectly clear, this is not information that we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> so in effect, they're saying that one of the strongest reasons for this anger we've been seeing from europe started with nothing. the misinterpretation, erin, of a single power point slide. >> wow, we shall see. that was the tip of the iceberg. thanks so much to you. >> republican senator rand paul sits on both the foreign relations and homeland security committees. great to have you with us. you heard james clapper's response. are they spying on america? and his answer was categorical, absolutely. if that's true, should america stop spying on its closest allies? >> i guess the real question, who is in cha
was elected. harry truman was elected. a busy second term. some the highlights. guest l bushman of nato. the korean war. -- and the establishment of nato. the assassination attempt. the 22nd amendment. how challenging a time was the second term? what's the first year was steady to be their happiest in the white house. they thought here is the chance, harry thought because this was when the fair deal started. it really started to kick off. then things go horribly wrong. largely because of korea. and shatters the economy the people's faith and ham and their willingness to understand and he -- in him and their wilderness to he threw a lot of mother. -- mud. >> bess spent more time in the white house. and forth.going back because of family issues. they reestablish their partnership. they get over the personal tensions they had in the early days when she was feeling a little left out. union is happier and steadier for a second term. >> let's take a look -- a call from lewis. opinionwas mrs. truman about her husband's association with tom pendergast? i know you mentioned him, what was her thi
about world war ii simply reflects the annoyance by americans who, for decades, declared nato being a credible deterrent for the soviet union. now nobody wants us to be working on terrorism. so why doesn't america stay home? in the future, if there is a war, we will stay home then, too. >> you can't compare because we are talking about the digital world. today, you can monitor activities concerning 3 billion people that you could not do before. being able to do so with the assistance necessary with service providers in the u.s.. >> private telephone and internet operators. >> no state can do that without the help of the private sector. these people are in silicon valley and not exactly [indiscernible] that is why europe is beyond this train. i am sure there is a question of cooperation between states. there is a kind of new era of negotiations. when there is someone to say that there is no exception to this. >> all this happening in the context of trade negotiations due to open where cyber commerce figures prominently. i want to thank our guests for being with us from geneva. thank
, this is not information that we collect the on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> reporter: now, there is strong sentiment in congress to rein in the powers of n.s.a. by prohibiting the mass collection of phone records but intelligence cheestles warned today, scott, that could put the country at higher risk. >> pelley: they made history again today on wall street. the dow jones industrial average was up more than 111 points to close at an all-time high of 16,680. the s&p closed up nearly 10 to a record 17 fon and change. we say that's history, but history isn't all that rare these days. that is the 32nd record close of the year for the dow. the 33rd for the s&p. senior business correspondent anthony mason is here. anthony, what companies are leading the way? >> reporter: it's not really any one stock leading this really, scott. it's nearly almost all of them. nearly nine out of 10 stocks on the s&p 500 are up this th year putting that index on the best course for a decade. boeing i
. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> and so let me just ask you this, as you study the networks of the world, and let's just talk about the european union for a second, if i may. is it possible for chinese intelligence services military or otherwise to use networks that you would find in any nation states in the european union. >> . >> computer networks inside the european union for what they are up to. >> absolutely. >> whow about al quaida, could they use, is it possible for them to use the networks found in the european union to conduct planning operations or execution of operations? >> could. absolutely. >> and would bit in the purview of the national security agency to try to prevent those activities especially if it went through the european union and maybe even targeted at the united states or one of our allies. >> it is chairman, and it is something that we share with our allies. >> so you would collect information in those cases and share it with our allies in a way that was appropriat
talks. the u.s. and n.a.t.o. troops withdraw from afghanistan next year. this is the fourth such meeting designed to bring stability to the region. >>> the syrian government said it will be attending the proposed two-peace conference meanwhile the hundreds fled the violence as the violence continues. >> reporter: spending a second day in damascus. the geneva two peace conference was thrown into doubt last week when rebel groups not only vowed to boycott it but to attack any who decide to attend. >> we are preparing for geneva two peace talks, and it will be the syrian parties who will decide the transitional period and what follows the transitional period. >> reporter: state television announced that brahini was told that the bashar al-assad government would be attending. but those in defiance said no negotiations will take place unless assad steps down first. >>> meanwhile on the ground the continued fighting is forcing more and more families to flee. close to the capital, hundreds of people picked up belongings they could and took off in foot in search of a place, any place that might
. it was the nsa, the u.s. and all of its nato partners. the cold data had nothing do with the spanish and french but a collection of call data listen -- listen to it in a number of countries in support of military operations. he said it is completely false. one, this was the msa doing this and, two, it was european citizens, french, and spanish citizens that were being listened to. pretty aggressive knockdown of that story and some of the source of some of the greatest criticism from european side of nsa surveillance. >> jim, part of the white house pushback has been everybody does it. clapper also saying that foreign countries also spy on the u.s. so -- looking at that further, is it possible that the president's blackberry is being read by the germans or the british? >> i asked this of a former official yesterday. i was being -- he said, sure. they probably go after it. i don't know if they would have success. nsa has advantages. but one of the points that mike rogers made in this hearing, and clapper and alexander, in effect, everyone's hands are dirty. they say, yes, we are the target of for
give him the dickens if he did not consult her on any major decision mike nato. >> host: question why did he call bes the boss? it seems like he did what he wanted and he did not --. >> i would not say he did what he wanted it was a partnership. >> that is instead is anything new that goes back for ever and ever. this is part of a marriage is all about. the mystery man grew up her father died and she was 18 in a very strong period the suffragettes period started then those different layers. >> one of her best friends was a well-known female journalist and best cheered her on every step of the way she is very supportive of margaret having a career it is just different. >> had she get been nicknamed the boss? >> we think harry started to call that in the mid-30s to is very organized with the senate office and she did not mind it intel he introduced her during the 40 campaign as the boss in margaret as the boss's boss she thought people would think margaret was spoiled. >> host: she worked in in his senate office because he paid her salary? >> the same way other people did it. bes did th
of the highlights of the second truman administration. the establishment of nato, the korean war, assassination attempt we talked about, and the 22nd amendment to the constitution following roosevelt creating presidential term limits. how challenging was the second term? >> the first year was z said to be the happiest in the white house saying here was the chance to be president in his own right, the fair deal started really kicking off, but then things go wrong, largely because of korea that shatters the economy, people's faith in him and willingness to understand. >> and mcarthur made the biggest show of it on earth, addressed congress and said, oh, soldiers never die, just fade away, and it was a popular song, and they threw a lot of mud, really. >> did beth change her approach to the first ladyship in the second term spending more time in the white house? >> she is still going back and forth a lot, but, again, that's largely because of family issues. she's -- they reestablished the partnership, get over the personal tensions they had in the early days where she's feeling left out. they find
to u.s. and nato withdrawal in afghanistan next year. >> most afghans suspicious of pakistan, saying their neighbor is playing a doing russ game, interfering to keep afghanistan unstable and supporting the taliban. they've watched president karzai visit without results. >> in action, they are not doing what they're saying. the action is important, not the talking. >> in august, afghan officials had hopes the prime minister could improve the strained relationship. president karzai extended his trip to islamabad and hoped to restart the peace process. >> between the civilian governments, the relationship has been lukewarm. the center of the problem ties to taliban is the role of pakistan's military. whether that has changed or not remains to be seen. >> karzai will ask for pakistan's help to fight armed groups and keep the taliban from disrupting next year's presidential election. >> karzai can't run in those election he is. he said there can be no peace in afghanistan without pakistan, but it's unclear whether he can persuade pakistan to deliver that peace. >> for more on the try late
was not the content of phone calls or phone calls themselves. this was part of a joint operation, the u.s. and nato allies that have nothing to do with the countries, spain and france, but had do with military operations abroad. >> we will speak to mike rogers. chairman of the house intelligence meeting with me later this hour. jim sciutto for that report. wlaets go to the crisis over obama care. and where it is heading. the official responsible for the obama care website today formally publicly apologized before congress for all of the problems that the users have been having and now into week five. does the president himself own apology for pledges he made repeatedly selling the affordable care act? >> putt like your doctor, you can keep your doctor under the reform proposals we put forward. if you like your private health insurance plan you can keep it if you like the plan you have, you can keep it. if you like the doctor you have, you can keep your doctor, too. we will keep this promise to the american people and if you like your doctor, you will be able to keep your doctor, period. if you like
want you to stop funding nato and protecting your entire continent, you just let us know if you don't like the way things are going in terms of our subsidizing your security. >> you got caught. you can't write these things down. >> that's the crime. all right. thank you. thank you, ross. >> just be careful. i don't know what you -- you know, i read one of your conversations and i'm not sure what you were talking about in this, but it was a little dicey, ross. >>> apple reporting quarterly results better than wall street. but investors initially weren't impressed. brian white is the head of global -- is that it? halloween is right around the corner. >> profits like -- >> could you turn me into a mouse with me just sitting right here right somehow. >> please do. >> not going to do it on set. >> so i just read that last week when apple said it was going to start giving away some software, that that's what changed the growth margin outlook that people initially looked at that looked lower when, in fact, it was better if you include what they said last week. is that what you're saying? >
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)